FAQ

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I thought EM fields were bad for audio. Why are ADD-Powr fields different?

Stray electromagnetic fields in the range of 100 kHz to 3 GHz, commonly known as RF interference (RFI) are a common cause of  noise in audio systems. ADD-Powr products generate em fields in the SLF or super low frequency range. They generate small electric currents with minimal magnetic  field components.

What is ElectraClear?

ElectraClear is not a filter. It is an active device that induces a carefully programmed range of pulsed frequencies onto the AC line, clocked from the original 50 or 60 Hz waveform. These harmonic overtones impact the low and middle audio range, so as to "harmonize" the sound. 

The device emits a frequency mirroring the AC frequency standard in the region of use, thereby maintaining its integrity, and eliminating tendencies to harshness of the sound.

There is a drop in the noise floor and a commensurate increase in the qualities of image depth, dimension, and realism in audio and video signals and systems

Why are multiple transformers used in the Sorcer?

Multiple transformers  create large electromagnetic fields. They are an effective low impedance interface to the AC line. The energy transfer is maximized  using several connected in series.

Is the Sorcer and Wizard compatible with other line conditioners?

It is preferable that they are installed in parallel to other conditioners, i.e. directly to a wall outlet. They should not be connected to AC power regenerators, isolation transformers, nor balanced power systems. 

What is the difference between the Symphony and Symphony Pro?

The Symphony Pro uses additional dual energy coils to generate its em field.  A larger field "tunes" / conditions existing em fields more effectively in a given area.

Where should the Sorcer be installed?

The units can be installed either in the a/v system, in an adjoining room, or at the AC entry point to the home or commercial space. 

Since x4 units are stronger they can be installed further away from the a/v system.